GHS English Courses

  • English 9

    Students will read and analyze a variety of literature while working on the skills of reading closely for textual details, making evidence based claims, researching to deepen understanding, and building evidence based arguments. Students will also learn to revise and edit their writing and will participate in several different learning activities to help them master the skills of English 9. 

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 9

    English 9 Pre-AP

    Students will read and analyze a variety of literature including reading from the Common Core 9th and 10th grade reading list and some classic literature chosen for this particular group. The reading of short stories, poems, plays, novels, and non-fiction will be more complex than that of 9R.  Students will learn to revise and edit using writing process skills. Note taking, research skills, speaking, listening, an introduction to argument, and applied practices will also be included. 

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 9

    English 10

    Students will read and analyze a variety of literature that includes poetry, short stories, novels, plays, and non-fiction while working on the skills of reading closely for textual details, making evidence based claims, researching to deepen understanding, and building evidence based arguments.  These skills will be mastered via a variety of reading, writing, speaking, and listening activities. Students will build upon the skills introduced in English 9 to further work towards college and career readiness and to prepare for their final exam and the Regents that will be given in English 11R.

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 10

    English 10 Pre-AP

    This is an enriched grade 10 English class providing students with an opportunity to explore literary ideas through the study of poetry, the novel, and drama.  Students will practice both CC Regents and AP Literature styles multiple-choice questions and essay prompts, while also learning different AP Language terminology.  Students are highly encouraged to revise and edit their writing when responding to a timed prompt/essay question. Students should select this pre-AP course if they receive the recommendation of their teacher and/or if they plan to take two years of Advanced Placement English with the understanding that while there will be work, it will help enrich their understanding of literature and writing as a preparation for college. Students in this course are expected to take the ELA Regents in June as their final exam.  A summer project will be issued in May, and due before school begins, to initiate analytical conversation at the start of the school year.

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 10

    English 11

    This course will focus on the Common Core State Standards for college and career readiness. The curriculum will include close reading, text based answers, and argument writing. Students will read and analyze a variety of literature including short stories, poems, plays, novels, and various forms of non-fiction such as historical documents, memoirs, and speeches. Students will further develop reading and writing skills that were introduced in 9th and 10th grades. All 11 English students will take the ELA Regents Exam. 

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 11

    ENG 101

    Gemini Course 

    The goals of ENG 101 are to develop students’ abilities to write at a college level and to think critically.  Students will learn to make decisions based on rhetorical concerns of writer’s purpose, readers’ needs, and the context in which documents are read.  As using sources effectively is one of the goals of the course, research will be interwoven into documents as a way to support ideas and connect with the audience.  The course emphasizes process-based writing, student reflection of their learning progress, and it culminates in a portfolio. Upon successful completion of the CCSS Regents in January, students will move onto the Gemini coursework during second semester.  A summer project will be issued in June, and due before school begins, to initiate analytical conversation at the start of the school year.

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 11
    • (3 FLCC credits)

    AP English Language and Composition

    This course is primarily a course in both effective writing and critical thinking.  In their writing, students will address topics and share ideas. They will learn how to gather information, develop a discourse, organize details, and, based on their specific audience, control the language in which the whole is realized.  As readers, they will learn to recognize the language patterns that authors have created and to describe their responses to these patterns. When the class becomes the audience for student writing, the skills of both reading and writing will be used in the dialogue between audience and author.  Students in this course are expected to take the ELA Regents in January and have the option of taking the AP Language exam in May for college credit. A summer project will be issued in May, and due before school begins, to initiate analytical conversation at the start of the school year.

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 11

    AP English Literature and Composition

    This course is designed to provide a college level program in literature and composition.  The students will read and write extensively. The interpretation of literature and the use of style in establishing the author's intent are emphasized.  American and British literature is studied, and extensive work is done with poetry, fiction, and drama. Multiple-choice practice and AP exam writing practice are a contributing force, along with the encouragement of revising their writing. At the end of the course, students will be prepared to take the AP exam in Literature and Composition (for college credit) and continue more extensive literature study of their choosing.  After the AP exam in May, students are responsible for a final research project as their culminating assessment. A summer project will be issued in May, and due before school begins, to initiate analytical conversation at the start of the school year.

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 12 

    English 12

    Students will read and write in genres that will help them question their place in society and prepare them to be responsible citizens. This course will provide students with practical speaking and writing skills for communicating with a spectrum of people through multiple avenues such as writing resumes and participating in mock job interviews.  Research, note taking, and data synthesis will be emphasized. They will focus on behaviors and skills essential for success in college and the workplace, including time management, organization, perseverance, and collaboration.

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grade 12
    • Must be used to meet English 12 requirements unless taking Gemini or AP course

    ENG 101

    Gemini Course

    The goals of ENG 101 are to develop students’ abilities to write at a college level and to think critically.  Students will learn to make decisions based on rhetorical concerns of writer’s purpose, readers’ needs, and the context in which documents are read.  As using sources effectively is one of the goals of the course, research will be interwoven into documents as a way to support ideas and connect with the audience.  The course emphasizes process-based writing, student reflection of their learning progress, and it culminates in a portfolio.  A summer project will be issued in May and due before school begins.

    • 1/2 unit / 1 semester
    • Grade 12
    • Prerequisite: Successful completion of the ELA CCSS Regents Exam
    • (3 FLCC credits)

    ENG 102 

    Gemini Course

    ENG 102 introduces students to a range of literary genres that may include poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction and develops skills in reading, interpreting, and evaluating literature.  Students will learn and practice the skills of close reading through discussion and writing and study well-known authors like Robert Frost and Langston Hughes and lesser known writers like Neil Gaiman and Art Spiegelman.  (Spring Semester)

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grades 11–12
    • Prerequisite: Successful completion of the ELA CCSS Regents Exam
    • (3 FLCC credits)
    • Enrollment limit: 16 students

    ENG 103 

    Gemini Course

    Continuing the educational goals of ENG 101 (reading, focused research, reflective writing, critical thinking, and process based writing), ENG 103 provides students with further practice in research, analysis, and persuasion to acquaint students with genres of writing done throughout college and beyond.  Students will learn to write a college-level research paper that includes an abstract and annotated bibliography. The final paper is a reflection essay. A summer project will be issued in June, and due before school begins, to help students strengthen their reading and writing skills during the summer months. (Fall Semester)

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grade 12
    • Prerequisite: Successful completion of the ELA CCSS Regents Exam and ENG 101
    • (3 FLCC credits)
    • Enrollment limit: 16 students

    COM 110:  Public Speaking                                                                                                 

    Gemini Course

    COM 110 introduces students to the necessary skills of public speaking that students will need in their adult lives.  Looking at public speaking, the students will develop skills in oral communication by helping students understand the principles of good public speaking:  organization, audience analysis, language, and presentation techniques.  Emphasis will be placed on the development of self-confidence through multiple speeches throughout the course.  They will organize their ideas on a multitude of topics to then produce speeches they will give to the class.

    • 1/2 unit/1 semester
    • Grades 11-12
    • Elective credit only
    • 3 FLCC credits

    Creative Writing

    Creative Writing is designed for students who wish to concentrate on fiction writing. The course will guide students in creative writing through experiences in three genres:  short story, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Through lecture, discussion, assigned reading, writing exercises, workshop writing, and peer editing, students will examine critically the elements of literary creation. The course is set up in a workshop-style format, so students should expect to share their writing with their classmates. Students are required to submit their original writing for publication, and the course culminates with a process-based portfolio.

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grades 10–12
    • May be used to meet English 12 requirements

    African-American Literature

    What does it mean to be black in America? What does it mean to be judged by the color of your skin and not the content of your character? Journey with us through the plight of African-Americans by reading their stories and hearing their songs. Students will study literature written by African-Americans that tells their extraordinary story of struggle, despair, determination and strength. We will read, discuss and research this literature that is deeply rooted in the African-American tradition, both past and present, in order to better understand the concept of African-American identity in America. Some of our black writers of focus will be: Ralph Ellison, Tupac, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Notorious B. I. G., Malcolm X, Common and Maya Angelou.

    • ½ unit / 1 semester
    • Grades 10-12
    • May be used to meet English 12 requirements

    The Art of Argument: An Introduction to Philosophy

    The Art of Argument: An Introduction to Philosophy focuses on debate, argument, and the philosophical background of the “big questions.” By refining these skills and recognizing the rhetoric, logical fallacies, and philosophical constructs used by speakers, students will gain the knowledge required of an informed citizen. Students will develop critical reasoning skills that will enable them to assess and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of any given argument or philosophical problem. A sample of the units to be covered includes the value of philosophy in the modern world; the arguments for and against the existence of God; Epistemology (the study of knowledge, truth, and reality); free will; and morality/ethics.

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grades 10–12
    • May be used to meet English 12 requirements

    Nightmare Literature: A Study of the Dystopian Society

    Dystopian literature is significant because it does something that many other genres do not; it warns society what could happen if we do not change our ways. Lessons learned from reading this type of literature include 21st century life skills like adaptability and problem solving. Students will be challenged to play the “What If” game. If “such and such” continues to happen, what will happen to society? Students will read fictional literature that bears a warning to future generations, engage in classroom discussions about these warnings and their effects on society, and complete a research project.  

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grades 10–12
    • May be used to meet English 12 requirements

    Film Analysis

    All films and TV shows begin exactly the same way:  a story script.  Film Analysis aims to focus on the critical analysis of various films and film studies (not be a we-watch-movies-all-day course), and there will be writing and consistent work required.  Basically, this course is a combination of analyzing film (as similar to literature) and a prep course for people interested in going into the film business to have some experience.  There will be an initial focus on film studies (camera angles and artistic directing choices) along with a research paper on a film, director, or film studies focus.  By the end of the course, students will produce his/her own short film as the final. Strong, consistent attendance will be required as films will be shown in class and such will drive the written instruction. This course will allow students to explore the analytical depth of film and the creative side of production.  

    • 1/2 unit/1 semester
    • Grades 10-12
    • May be used to meet English 12 requirements.

    Theatre History and Dramatic Analysis  (Drama and Theatre I)

     This course is an introduction to the art of drama and theatre.  Students will study theatre history as well as selected plays, set in various historical contexts, which provide a basis for understanding elements and styles of drama.  Students will be able to discuss the origin and development of the theatre as well as the theatre’s influence and importance in human culture. Students will also compare and contrast plays and theatre practices from different time periods, cultures, and genres spanning from tragedy to comedy while reading and acting through various pieces.  

    • ½ unit / 1 semester
    • Grades 10-12
    • Elective credit only

    Practical Theatre  (Drama and Theatre II)

    Practical Theatre is the setting where students put their experiences and knowledge into practice. Theatre production will be explored by considering the functions of actors, audiences, designers, playwrights, and technicians in more detail.  Students will build and work on their skills from playwriting, theatre design, directing, and acting. Students will analyze the artistic choices and techniques used to transform a written dramatic script into a performed work presented to an audience.  Students will create, perform, and record a one act play of their own design. (Spring Semester)

    • ½ unit / 1 semester
    • Grades 10–12
    • Elective credit only