GHS Social Studies Courses

  • Global History and Geography I

    This is the first part of a 2-year program in the study of the history and geography of the world. The course will examine the history of the world chronologically. This course is designed to meet the global history and geography core curriculum and will focus on the five social studies standards set by New York State. This course will cover the history of the world until 1750. Students will be expected to pass the

    NY State Regents Exam in Global History and Geography after completing Global I and Global II. This is a required course for a diploma in New York State.

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 9

    Global History and Geography II

    This is the second part of a 2-year program in the study of the history and geography of the world. The course will examine the history of the world chronologically. This course is designed to meet the global history and geography core curriculum and will focus on the five social studies standards set by New York State. This course will study the history of the world from 1750 to the present. Students will be expected to pass the New York State Regents Exam in Global History and Geography at the end of this course. This is a required course for a diploma in New York State.

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 10
    • Prerequisite: Global History and Geography I

    Pre-AP World History

    This is the first part of a two-year, college level world history course. The course will examine

    the world from a chronological approach. The focus will be on world history between 10,000 BCE and 1750 CE. There will be an equal emphasis placed on the study of Asia, Africa, Europe, North America, and South America. Within the context of the time periods of history, students will study global connections through trade and conquest. Students enrolled in this course will learn advanced historical thinking skills and analytical writing skills.

    Students who successfully complete this two-year program are equipped with the knowledge and skills to take the Advanced Placement examination in May of their sophomore year and potentially earn college credit(s). Students will be expected to pass the New York State Regents Exam in Global History and Geography at the end of their sophomore year.

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 9

    AP World History

    This is the second part of a two-year, college level world history course. The course will examine the world from a chronological approach. The focus will be on world history from 1750–present. There will be an equal emphasis placed on the study of Asia, Africa, Europe, North America, and South America. Within the context of the time periods of history, students will study global connections through trade and conquest. Students enrolled in this course will learn advanced historical thinking skills and analytical writing skills.

    Students who successfully complete this two-year program are equipped with the knowledge and skills to take the Advanced Placement examination in May of their sophomore year and potentially earn college credit(s). Students will be expected to pass the New York State Regents Exam in Global History and Geography at the end of their sophomore year.

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 10
    • Prerequisite: Pre-AP World History

    U.S. History and Government

    This is a chronologically organized course in United States history and government. The emphasis in this course is on the United States as an industrial nation. Constitutional, legal, and international issues are covered. The course is designed to meet the core curriculum of New York State. At the end of the course, students will be expected to pass the NY State Regents Exam in United States History and Government. This is a required course for a diploma in New York State.

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 11

    AP U.S. History

    This is a college level American History course. Successful completion of the advanced placement examination in American History may earn college credit. The course will develop skills that will be needed at the college level. It uses a chronological approach to American History from the first settlers to the present era. Students who have not taken the NY State United States History and Government Regents also must take the Regents examination.

    • 1 unit/full year
    • Grade 11
    • Prerequisite: Pass Global History and Regents exam

    Practical Law

    This introduces the student to law and the legal system. Areas covered include: criminal and civil law, the legal process from arrest to arraignment, steps to a trial, and cyber law. Students will participate in mock trials and visit city court.

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grades 11–12

    AP Psychology

    This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals.  This course surveys the major sub-disciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions, and group and cultural processes. Students will prepare to take the AP Psychology exam in May.

    • 1 unit / full year
    • Grades 11-12

    Sociology

    How do people live together in groups? What are the roles we play and why? Who decides what is normal and what is deviant? Learn about society. In this course, the students select topics to be studied ranging from Deviant Behavior to Belief Systems to Values and Norms. Students compare our society with the Eskimos, BamButi, Yanomamo, and other groups. Participation in class required.

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grades 11–12

    Modern U.S. History

    This is a course designed to examine the history of the United States from World War II to the present. The course will take a much deeper look at our history during the decades from the 1950’s to 2010’s in a more thorough way than the Regents class does. Through the use of movies, music, readings and discussions, the course will probe the Cold War, Vietnam, the Civil Rights movement, the Counter-Culture of the 1960’s and many other topics all the way to the Gulf War and 9/11. This study will consider how these events led to the world we live in today.

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grades 11–12

    Government

    What are the rights and responsibilities of citizens? What are some of the issues facing the US? You will investigate problems and discover solutions. Students will use an issue-based approach to public policy. They will further develop tools and skills needed in the real-world and gain knowledge needed for effective citizenship. This course includes independent research, public speaking, and debate with opportunities to participate in the political process. This is a required course for a diploma in New York State.

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grade 12

    POL Science 100: Government

    Gemini Course

    This college level course explores the nature and dynamics of the American political system, including the basic structure, functions, and processes of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government, the roles of political parties and special interest groups, the mechanics of political campaigns and elections, the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights, and prominent issues in U.S. Domestic and foreign policy. This course carries SUNY General Education credit.

    • 3 FLCC credits
    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grade 12

    AP Government and Politics

    This college level course in United States Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. Certain topics are usually covered in all college courses. Students will prepare to take the AP Gov & Politics exam in May.

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grade 12

    AP Comparative Government

    The AP course in Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes. Six countries form the core of the AP Comparative Government and Politics course: China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia. Students will prepare to take the AP Comparative Gov exam in May.

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grades 11–12
    • Cannot be used as a Senior credit for graduation.

    Economics

    This course is a survey of economic theory. It will include a study of micro-economic issues such as supply and demand, economic decision making, and competition and its effects and pricing. Also, it will include a study of macroeconomic issues such as inflation, recession, pollution, money, fiscal and monetary policy. This is a required course for a diploma in New York State.

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grade 12

    ECO 100: Survey of Economics

    Gemini Course

    This is an introductory course dealing with the principles of economics and how they are applied to consumer choices, business decisions, and within the domestic economy. Students will examine the role of public/private sectors, markets, market structures, economic indicators, and fiscal and monetary policies as they relate to the U.S. Economy.

    • 3 FLCC credits
    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grade 12

    AP Microeconomics

    AP Microeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers.  The course also develops students’ familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy.  Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts.  The AP Microeconomics course provides students with an understanding of the principles of economics as they apply to individual decision-making units, including individual households and firms.  The course examines the theory of consumer behavior, the theory of the firm, and the behavior of profit-maximizing firms under various market structures.  Students evaluate the efficiency of the outcomes with respect to price, output, consumer surplus, and producer surplus.  They examine the behaviors of households and business in factor markets, and learn how the determination of factor prices, wages, interest, and rent influence the distribution of income in a market economy.  There are ample opportunities to consider instances in which private markets may fail to allocate resources efficiently and examine various public policy alternatives aimed at improving the efficiency of private markets. Students will prepare to take the AP Microeconomics exam in May.

    • 1/2 unit/semester
    • Grades 11-12

    Colonies to Country: Foundational Issues in American History

    We will be examining the development of U.S. history and study the political, social, and economic movements that have shaped the early Republic. This course explores the social, political, intellectual and cultural development of America from 1625 to 1824, covering such topics as Colonial Sectionalism, the Era of the American Revolution, the “Critical Period” and Constitutional Convention, and The New Republic through the Monroe Doctrine. We will use of variety of means to pursue our studies, including lecture, primary source analysis, video, small group work, and active participation. Students will examine selected materials and items, attempting to analyze and interpret them in light of the Essential Questions.

    • ½ unit/1 semester
    • Grade 12

    Sports Production & Analytics                                                                                                       

    Have you ever thought of a career in sports?  You don’t have to be an athlete to pursue a career in athletics.  This course is designed to provide students with real experience in the world of sports production.  You will record games, create highlight tapes, break down game film, design and operate scoreboard graphics, announce events, manage social media accounts, and track sports analytics.  If you’re interested in sports, graphic design, statistics, analytics, or videography, this class could be a great opportunity for you.  Be aware that you will, at times, be required to attend and work athletic events outside of school hours.

    • 1/2 unit / semester
    • Grades 10-12

    Study of History through Art

    This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to apply their knowledge of history to various art forms including music, literature, paintings and film. This content will center on pivotal themes throughout history such as Culture, Conflict and Change, Belief Systems, Diversity and Political Systems.

    • 1/2 unit/semester
    • Grades 10-12
    • Completion of Global Studies II or recommendation of the Global Studies I teacher

    Women's History of the 20th Century and Modern Day

    What does it mean to be a woman throughout history?  Throughout different world cultures?  Who are the women who have helped shape the course of history for the modern era?  This course will explore the history of women’s issues across the 20th century until the modern day.  Topics will cover a wide range of historical events and modern examples and the role that women have played across time and region.  Some highlights will include but are not limited to the study of women’s suffrage, contributions during the World Wars, women’s rights at mid-century, changing gender roles and power, traditional cultures, and women’s rights as human rights.  The learning will take place using a variety of teaching methods such as lecture, assigned readings, group discussions, and inquiry based projects with interactive discussion among peers being a central component of the class.  Guest female presenters from a variety of career areas will also be invited to present throughout the course to help with career exploration and planning for the future.

    • 1/2 unit/semester
    • Grades 10-12
    • Prerequisites:  Completion of Global History and Geography I

    Mental Illness: Past and Present

    How and where we care for the mentally ill has been an ongoing issue in America. In this course, you will learn about mental disorders. The course will begin by taking a historical look at who was considered mentally ill in the past and how and where these people were cared for. We will then shift our focus to answering the following questions:  How has the understanding and diagnosis of mental illness changed over time? What are the current approaches to caring for the mentally ill?  What are the current mental disorders? How do mental disorders impact those who suffer from them?  Why is it important for the general public to understand mental illness? How can mental disorders be treated and/or cured?

    • ½ unit / 1 semester
    • Grades 11-12